The Science of Attraction

(Helen Fisher PhD researched this enlightening study in depth.)

A Relationship Guide for your best Personality Match

 

 

  • A recent three-year study revealed:  4 different chemical systems were found in the brain, which contributes to forming your personality.

 

  • Not just hormones, but rather Systems: One, or more of the systems, have determined your behavior, decisions, and emotions since birth. 

 

  • Find yourself and your ideal partner's desirable characteristics.

 

  • Be sure you have the right match for your personality.       There will be some overlap between the systems but you'll see your dominance.    

Dopamine

Novelty

Curious

Impulsive

Spontaneous

Open Minded

Creative             

Serotonin

Cautious

Traditional

Meticulous

Routines

Loyal

Dependable

Testosterone

Structured

Competitive

Independent

Decisive

Uncompromising

Tough Minded

Estrogen

Diplomatic

Trusting

Social

Agreeable

Insightful

Big picture

 How to Talk to each Personality Type

Dopamine 

Go somewhere. Take a walk in a park. Give them time to think. Don’t grill them on how they’re feeling.

Ask what they do.  Sitting around is no fun for the Explorer, unless it’s in a new location. 

 

Serotonin

They can have a conversation, keep it familiar. Debate how to do stuff. Say 5 positive to 1 negative statement or you’ll lose them right away. Pick a time to talk. Schedule it. They like similar personality type.

 

Testosterone

Get straight to the point. Keep it matter of fact. Be relaxed in your pose. Be totally honest. Be tough.

They don’t want their same personality type, more opposite.

 

Estrogen

Leave lots of time to talk. They want to be heard. Talk about how they feel. They rehash past arguments.

They see connections and want to talk about it. They want opposite personality type.

Helen Fisher Ph.D. author of 'Why Him Why Her'. This page is an adaptation from her book. Dr Fisher is a biological anthropologist, and a leading expert on the biology of love and attraction. She has studied human behavior in romantic relationships for over 30 years.(B.A. in Anthropology and Psychology from New York University in 1968; an M.A. in Physical Anthropology, Cultural Anthropology, Linguistics, and Archeology from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1972, and a Ph.D. in Physical Anthropology: Human Evolution, Primatology, Human Sexual Behavior, and Reproductive Strategies from the University of Colorado at Boulder)